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Health Charities

CLAN Cancer Support

CLAN Cancer Support is a local charity providing emotional and practical support to people affected by cancer, their family, carers and friends, free of charge. Services available include information and support, counselling, complementary therapies, social and wellbeing activities and dedicated support for children and families. Services are available at 11 local support and wellbeing centres located across north-east Scotland.
www.clanhouse.org

Macmillan Cancer

Macmillan Cancer Support
One in three of us will get cancer and it’s the toughest thing most of us will ever face. If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, or a loved one has, you’ll want a team of people in your corner supporting you every step of the way. Macmillan provide practical, medical and financial support and push for better cancer care.

Marie Curie Cancer Care

Marie Curie Cancer Care is a UK charity dedicated to the care of people with terminal cancer and other illnesses. Over the financial year 2010/11, we reached a total of 31,799 patients

Youth Health Talk

YouthHealthTalk
Youthhealthtalk enables young people, their family and friends, and professionals such as doctors and teachers to understand young people's experiences of health, illness and life in general. The website feature real-life accounts of issues such as effect on work and education, social life and relationships, consulting health professionals and treatment.

Bowel Screening

Bowel Screening

Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in Scotland after lung and breast cancer. Every year, almost 4,000 people are diagnosed with the disease.

The Scottish Bowel Screening Programme will invite all men and women in Scotland between the ages of 50 to 74 for screening every two years. The programme has been rolled out across Scotland and is now available in all NHS Boards.

Why is screening important?

Bowel cancer is more common in people over 50 years of age, especially in men. One in 20 of us over 50 years of age will get bowel cancer at some point in our lives.

Screening aims to find bowel cancer at an early stage in people with no symptoms. The screening test looks for hidden blood in the bowel motion, as this may suggest a higher chance of bowel cancer.

Other changes in the bowel can also be found, such as polyps (non-cancerous growths). If found, most polyps can be easily removed and often prevent future cancers developing.

If bowel cancer is detected early enough through screening, there is a 90% chance
of treating the disease successfully.

For approximatelyevery 650 people invited for regular screening, one bowel cancer death will be prevented. In Scotland this will mean the screening programme will prevent at least 150 deaths from bowel cancer each year.

Of our practice population invited for screening, 64 % returned their tests.    For more information click here to visit the bowel screning website.


link below


 
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